REVIEWS

REVIEWS:

"Fabulous read on daily life inside a plantation home pre, during and post civil war. Easy read, and once past the first few chapters, could not put the book down. Heart warming throughout, and brought tears in the last chapter. GREAT WORK, Mrs. Poovey! AND, a must read for anyone who has visited, lived, or studied life in the low country of South Carolina!! "

"It pairs perfectly with coffee and chocolate."

"I was up half the night because I couldn't stop reading!"

"I absolutely loved this book!!!! It made me laugh, cry and unable to put it down!!!!!!"

"Loved, loved your book Kim. Please write another!!"

"Not only did I "like" it, I loved it!"

"The book is fabulous...started it at night-finished it two mornings later; couldn't put it down."

Monday, July 29, 2013

A Hairy Situation

Hair was a very important commodity in the Victorian era.
 A lady kept excess hair gathered from her brush in something called a 'hair receiver', a small container with a hole in the lid. 
These wads of hair were referred to as 'rats' and were used to add volume to hairstyles much like hair pieces are used today.
Hair receivers can be found in various styles and materials such as porcelain, silver, Bakelite, celluloid, or crystal.
 
A hand-painted porcelain hair receiver with yellow roses and songbird.
 
This footed hair receiver is bedecked with gold trim and delicate roses.
 
This silver hair receiver is part of a matching dresser set including a hair brush, clothing brushes, and trinket box.
 
Example of a hair rat:).
A lady could roll her hair around this to give substance to a bun or swept-up hair style.
 
Hair combs were the crowning jewel to the final hair style.
 
Visit again soon for posts on additional uses for hair during the Victoria era:).


Friday, July 26, 2013

Facebook Link



For those of you have tried to find my Truer Words Facebook page, here is the link:
 
 
I don't know why it is difficult to find but for some reason it is:).
Every week I post something about the Victorian era as it relates to the main character of the novel, Emma.
Please visit the page and 'like' it.
 
 
Thanks!!!
 
Blessings,
 
Kim
 
 


Tuesday, July 23, 2013

Hooked on Emma's World!!!

Button hooks have been used for centuries but this post addresses those most often seen in the latter part of the 19th century and early 20th century.
 
These tools were used for buttons on boots, gloves, or clothing.

 
A variety of materials were used for the handles to include silver, porcelain, celluloid, or wood.
Some had advertisements stamped into the handles while silver handles might have initials engraved. Still other styles included duel hooks for both boots and gloves.
Emma would have used tools similar to these when buttoning her boots or gloves.
 
 


Monday, July 15, 2013

One of the popular pastimes of Victorian ladies was porcelain painting. Blanks from Europe were imported to be decorated in an array of flora, birds, cherubs, or whatever the artist chose to paint. Despite the notable talent of American ladies, their work was denied entry into the 1901 World's Fair in Paris as they were looked upon as mere amateurs. In Emma's world this would have been a socially acceptable way to pass an afternoon but as we all know she had other things that she would rather be doing!





To learn more about Emma's antics and daily life read Truer Words,
available on most online booksellers as well as kindle, nook, and ebook.
To purchase a signed copy visit the icon on this page!
 
 

Friday, July 12, 2013

Emma Victoria Brown attends 150th Anniversary of Battle of Gettysburg

Recently Emma made the long ride to Gettysburg for the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg.

Although not at the original battle, she did experience her share of civil war battles.

To learn more about Emma's civil war experiences read the historic novel, Truer Words.

Author Kim Poovey (Truer Words) with fellow author, Thomas Tear (Memoirs of a Confederate Gentleman). Both publications from Tate Publishing.